The Mental Health Minute

Articles and news about mental health issues

Obsessive compulsive disorder commonly coupled with depression and bipolar disorder

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Here’s an interesting article I found on DailyRx about research investigating the incidence of two or more disorders being present at one time.  I have often wondered about OCD and Bipolar in my 20 years of psychiatric nursing.  They seem to share common characteristics.  Although with a bipolar, the OCD may not express itself quite as obviously as it does in someone who only has OCD; there are, however, many similarities to the behaviors expressed by both groups.

Please read this article and visit the site for more interesting articles.  Let me know your views on the topic if you care to.  I am always open to hearing other people’s ideas about mental health issues.

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The prevalence of mental health disorders along with a recent increase in mental health awareness is beginning to help researchers understand how these disorders develop.

Considering the rarity of mental health diseases such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder, one would think it would be quite uncommon for such diseases to occur concurrently in an individual. However, a new study shows very high rates of comorbidity in mental health disorders, increasing the severity of some diseases.

Inform your therapist if you have more than one health issue.

A recent study, available through the Anxiety Disorders Association of America’s journal Depression and Anxiety, investigated the role of comorbidity in the expression of OCD. Kiara Timpano, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Miami, led the study.

The Structured Clinical Review for DSM-IV was used to evaluate 605 OCD patients. Split into three groups, 13.1% of the group was bipolar, 64.1% were largely depressed, and 22.8% had OCD alone.

Comparisons among the groups analyzed comorbidity patterns, OCD symptoms, and impairments in order to determine the severity of their ailments.

Bipolar disorder patients revealed the most severe symptoms, followed by depression, and finally those with OCD alone. Fortunately, bipolar comorbidty represents a smaller segment.

Timpano explains, “those individuals with comorbid affective disorders, particularly BPD (bipolar disorder), represent a clinically severe group compared to those without such comorbidity.”

Treatments are available for obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, and major depression and show great results to many sufferers.

Talk with your doctor if suffering from a mental health disorder.

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December 5, 2011 - Posted by | Mental Health | , , , , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. […] the rest here: Obsessive compulsive disorder commonly coupled with depression … Be Sociable, Share! Tweet This entry was posted in Anxiety Disorders and tagged […]

    Pingback by Obsessive compulsive disorder commonly coupled with depression … | www.drfouly.org | December 5, 2011 | Reply

  2. To my mind psychiatry is not an exact science even today. Many of the mental disorders have lists of symptoms which are very similar to each other. Could several disorders be diagnosed to ensure the correct diagnosis is covered? There can one problem with this approach. The symptoms might be similar. However, the treatments can be different.
    This is simply my observation having been diagnosed bipolar many years ago.

    Comment by Ray Tyler | December 5, 2011 | Reply

  3. […] Obsessive compulsive disorder commonly coupled with depression and bipolar disorder (skwillms.wordpress.com) […]

    Pingback by That Bipolar feeling… | Day in the life of a Busy Gal… | December 20, 2011 | Reply


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